CareerLocker: Still a Slam Dunk to help you Select a College or University

Basketball HoopThe National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) annually oversees March Madness Division I men’s and women’s basketball championships. The students, who participate in these tournaments, reflect excellence both on the court and in the classroom. CareerLocker is a valuable resource to teach you about the 132 colleges and universities represented by these college student athletes.

Pick your Teams

Every year NCAA releases a list of brackets for the tournament. Again this year, UW-Madison professor of industrial and systems engineering, Laura Albert McLay, uses data analytic techniques to try to accurately predict NCAA winners. Dr. McLay has been on several news shows talking about “bracketology.” In addition, UW-Madison library is conducting a book bracket, where students select the winning book. Matilda, Harry Potter, and Lord of the Rings are among previous winners.

Selecting your Winning School

The extensive CareerLocker website lists over 6,000 colleges and universities. Use CareerLocker’s compare colleges and schools to create side-by-side comparisons of your contenders for schools to attend. The website lists general information, student body, costs, financial aid, admissions, sports, majors and degrees, and ROTC information. Wherever you decide to attend school, CareerLocker is a slam dunk, supporting you through your decision-making process!

Professional Development: Career Development Facilitator (CDF) Training

Global Career Development Training PhotoWhat is a Career Development Facilitator?

A Career Development Facilitator (CDF) is a person who works in any career development setting or who incorporates career development information or skills in their work with students, adults, clients, employees, or the public. A CDF has received in-depth training in the areas of career development in the form of 120 class/instructional hours, provided by a nationally qualified and certified trainer.

This training is centered around developing 12 competencies in the field, which were developed by the National Career Development Association (NCDA), the professional association for career development in the United States. After completion of the training, the individual may apply for and receive national certification through the Center for Credentialing and Education, a subsidiary of the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Who Should Receive this Training?

CDF training can enhance the skills and knowledge of individuals who work in any type of career development setting. This may include those who serve as a career group facilitator, career coach, intake interviewer, human resource specialist, school counselor, job search trainer, labor market information resource person, employment/ placement specialist, or workforce development staff person. CDFs from past classes have included those who work in corporations, government agencies, technical colleges, small private companies, large universities, high schools and middle schools, correctional institutions, and entrepreneurial settings.

Course Schedule

The Career Development Facilitator course is offered in a convenient hybrid format to suit the varying needs and schedules of participants. This format includes the online coursework as well as two 2-day trips for classes at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.**

Summer 2017 May 30 – Aug. 28, 2017
Class Format CDF Home Study/ Distance Education (hybrid)
Location Online and 2 meetings in Madison, WI on June 22-23 and July 27-28, 2017
Cost Tuition: $1450.00
Summer 2017 Registration Form
Books will be purchased by the student. Estimated book costs: $175-$185
Fall 2017 Sept. 12-Dec. 19, 2017
Class Format CDF Home Study/ Distance Education (hybrid)
Location Online and 2 meetings in Madison, WI on Oct. 5-6 and Nov. 15-16, 2017)
Cost Tuition: $1450.00
Fall 2017 Registration Form
Books will be purchased by the student. Estimated book costs: $175-$185

About the Instructor

Photo of Judy EttingerJudith Ettinger, PhD, LPC, is a CDF Master Trainer and CDF Instructor. She has been working in the field of career development for 30 years, and travels throughout the world delivering career development technical assistance and training. Dr. Ettinger is a Project Director at the Center on Education and Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the developer and instructor of the online, independent-study course Planning for Retirement: Exploring Your Career and Leisure Options. She has received numerous awards and recognition for her work, including the Distinguished Achievement Award, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Outstanding Practitioner Award, National Career Development Association; UCLA Extension Distinguished Instructor Award for 2012; and the National Customer Service Award from the U.S. Department of Labor.

For more information
Contact Judy Ettinger, Instructor, at:

Center on Education and Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison
1025 W. Johnson Street,
964 Educational Sciences Building
Madison, WI 53706-1796
jmetting@wisc.edu
(608) 263-4367

Focus on Occupations: Math-Related Occupations Add Up to Great Opportunities

Focus on Occupations, Math-Related Occupations Banner

March 14th or 3.14 is known as Pi Day. Pi is an irrational number and the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.  Almost every job requires people to have knowledge of math. In honor of Pi Day, CareerLocker focuses on occupations where people rely heavily on math to complete job tasks. Occupations include climate change analysts, computer programmers, construction materials estimators, mathematicians, and mathematical statisticians. Many of these occupations are hot occupations and projected to grow by at least 27% over the next 10 years. This adds up to great opportunities!

  • Climate Change Analysts–Climate change analysts study weather patterns to see how and why our modern climate is different from the climate of the past. They spend their time analyzing data and writing papers and speeches. They specifically study atmospheric temperature, ocean conditions, ice masses, and greenhouse gases. They are concerned with determining how these changes impact natural resources, animals, and people. Climate change analysts attempt to create mathematical models of climate change.
  • Computer Programmers–Computer programmers write instructions that tell computers to perform a variety of different tasks.Programmers use computer languages to write programs. They may write programs that will perform accounting or billing functions. Other programs may operate robots or computer-aided design (CAD) machine tool operations. Some programs allow people to create artwork or graphics, while others coordinate space flight operations.
  • Construction Material Estimators— Cost estimators determine the cost of manufacturing products or providing services to prospective customers. They must arrive at costs that meet customer expectations, are lower than their competitors, and are profitable to the organization. They calculate the cost of all the necessary parts, raw materials, and equipment. Estimators arrive at labor costs based on hourly rates and the time they think it will take to produce the product or provide the service desired. They prepare itemized cost estimates and/or present total project costs.
  • Mathematicians–Mathematicians specialize in either theoretical mathematics or applied mathematics. Most mathematicians work in applied mathematics. They solve problems using many different kinds of math and math-related areas. These include computer science, engineering, physics, and business management.
  • Mathematical StatisticiansStatisticians use math to design, interpret, and evaluate the results of experiments, surveys, and opinion polls. They also use math to predict future events. They often apply their mathematical knowledge to specific subject areas, such as economics, human behavior, natural science, or engineering.

Construction material estimators, mathematicians, and mathematical statisticians are Hot Occupations. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 27%.

CareerLocker Announces New Plan of Study Module

sampleplanofstudy copyCareerLocker announces the launch of a new module, Plan of Study. Made with 8th graders through high schoolers in mind, this module helps students plan. The purpose of Plan of Study is to help students consider which classes could be of interest to them in high school. Students can select a CareerClusterTM and occupations to create a personalized plan of study based on their interests. If students are unsure what occupations they are interested in, they can create multiple alternative plans of study depending upon what direction their career trajectory could take them. This module is designed to be implemented in conjunction with conversations between students and their parents, teachers, and counselors. State of Wisconsin graduation requirements are highlighted with the caveat that different schools have different requirements and each student situation is unique.

Watch CareerLocker’s short video explaining how to use Plan of Study.

Summer Institute Highlights Academic and Career Planning, Labor Market Information and Informal Assessments

18th Annual Summer Institute

Join us this summer for professional development workshops delivered on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Here’s your opportunity to network with colleagues and receive quality professional development training.

Institute #1: FORWARD into the Future: Developing Your Academic and Career Plans for Grades 6-12 (ACP)

Thursday, July 13, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm :: $129

Whether you serve as a K-12 educator, as a higher education professional, or as a professional in the community, learning about Academic and Career Planning (ACP) can help you support your students’ or clients’ career development. PI 26 requires students in the state of Wisconsin grades 6-12 to have an ACP. Learn how to examine what aspects of ACP your school or organization is already implementing. Discover new activities for working with students and clients to help them Know, Explore, Plan and Go, the foundation of ACP. Explore professional development activities to train staff to engage with ACP implementation.

This workshop will include didactic and experiential activities to maximize participants’ foundational knowledge of ACP, and provide ideas for working with students and clients with the aim of increasing the number of college and career ready students in the state of Wisconsin and beyond.

Institute #2: Observations on Emerging Labor Market Trends

Friday, July 14, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm :: $65

What role does career and labor market information play in career decision-making? How can we use that information to enhance both exploration and goal setting? As career practitioners, we frequently search through resources attempting to use the most up-to-date and relevant information but it is sometimes difficult to know which source to use.

This Institute will increase your confidence when locating, evaluating, and using career information to help individuals with their career concerns. Specifically we will talk about trending terms such as the “skills gap”, the “gig economy” (contract work), digital badges, and how this information can be used to assist our clients and students.

Institute #3: Informal Assessments and Methods for Using Them in Your Practice

Friday, July 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm :: $65

Informal assessments typically generate information about individuals through less structured means. They emphasize qualitative findings rather than quantitative. While these instruments are less precise than formal assessments, they are often dynamic and allow for more involvement by the client/student both when the instrument is administered and when the results are discussed.

During this Institute we will spend time completing and examining several instruments. We will also engage in the narrative approach that is used with much success in career planning. Throughout the Institute participants will also have an opportunity to practice their listening/interviewing skills.

Credit in the form of a Certificate of Attendance will be given which can be used to verify hours. CEUs ($15 fee payable on site) and NBCC credit are also available.

For more information on the Summer Institute and to register, click here.

Please direct any questions to Judy Ettinger at jmetting@wisc.edu