Focus on Occupations: Educators Build Communities of Learners

Education-Related Occupations Graphic

Labor Day marks the end of summer, kicks off fall, and back-to-school. Schools are comprised of caring professionals who serve their communities by bringing their knowledge of best learning and teaching practices, supporting the development of the entire child. They help students expand their academic, physical, socio-emotional, vocational, and cognitive development. Here at CareerLocker, we recognize the hard work of these amazing professionals. From the teacher to the principal to the school maintenance worker, so many work together to enhance the welfare of children, adolescents, and adults. These children grow into adults who contribute to our community, country, and ultimately the world. Some of the education-related professions include education administrators, elementary and secondary school teachers, physical education teachers, school counselors, and speech-language pathologists.

  • Education Administrators–manage educational institutions or departments within them. Some direct the activities of preschools, while others supervise instruction in primary and secondary schools. Educational administrators select and supervise staff, prepare budgets, and evaluate programs. They preside over meetings and advise on matters related to their programs. They also attend school functions and promote good public relations.
  • Elementary school teachers–usually teach children in grades one through eight. They plan and teach lessons. They design learning activities for students each day. They also test and record the progress of each student. They discuss these records with parents. Some elementary teachers specialize in areas such as art, music, or physical education. In some schools, two or three teachers work together to teach classes. This is called team teaching.
  • Secondary school teachers–teach middle school or high school students. They teach specific subjects such as English, math, social studies, and science. Teachers usually teach five or six classes per day. They prepare lesson plans, conduct class discussions, give homework assignments, and tests. They also correct homework and grade tests. They monitor the progress of their students and discuss it with their students’ parents. Some coach athletic teams or serves as advisors to clubs.
  • Physical Education Teachers–teach sports and exercises to children and young adults in grades one through twelve. They plan games and exercises that improve fitness and develop students’ motor and coordination skills. These games and exercises are suited to the ages and abilities of their students. Physical education teachers may teach general fitness courses that provide regular exercise or teach the use of sports special equipment such as trampolines or weights. They teach the rules and techniques of indoor and outdoor sports, such as volleyball, basketball, or football.
  • School Counselors–work with all students to help them develop the skills they will need to learn, communicate, and work effectively. They help students identify their interests, skills, aptitudes, and educational goals. They help students plan their academic programs so they graduate from high school prepared for work or postsecondary education. Counselors give standardized tests to students to measure their achievement in school. They have students complete interest inventories or other questionnaires to help them identify their strengths, recognize problem areas, and explore career options. Counselors interpret these test results for students, their parents, and teachers.
  • Speech-Language¬†Pathologists–work with people who have speech or language impairments. They evaluate the impairment of each individual and develop a therapy program to help each of them communicate more effectively. In early intervention programs, they work with infants and toddlers who have a variety of physical and/or developmental challenges. They work with families identifying their concerns, priorities, and preferences for their children. A comprehensive plan of care is developed for each individual that includes speech and language. Speech-language pathologists try to prevent communication problems from occurring. They test children to see if they speak as well as other children of the same age.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s