Focus on Occupations: Math-Related Occupations Add Up to Great Opportunities

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March 14th or 3.14 is known as Pi Day. Pi is an irrational number and the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.  Almost every job requires people to have knowledge of math. In honor of Pi Day, CareerLocker focuses on occupations where people rely heavily on math to complete job tasks. Occupations include climate change analysts, computer programmers, construction materials estimators, mathematicians, and mathematical statisticians. Many of these occupations are hot occupations and projected to grow by at least 27% over the next 10 years. This adds up to great opportunities!

  • Climate Change Analysts–Climate change analysts study weather patterns to see how and why our modern climate is different from the climate of the past. They spend their time analyzing data and writing papers and speeches. They specifically study atmospheric temperature, ocean conditions, ice masses, and greenhouse gases. They are concerned with determining how these changes impact natural resources, animals, and people. Climate change analysts attempt to create mathematical models of climate change.
  • Computer Programmers–Computer programmers write instructions that tell computers to perform a variety of different tasks.Programmers use computer languages to write programs. They may write programs that will perform accounting or billing functions. Other programs may operate robots or computer-aided design (CAD) machine tool operations. Some programs allow people to create artwork or graphics, while others coordinate space flight operations.
  • Construction Material Estimators— Cost estimators determine the cost of manufacturing products or providing services to prospective customers. They must arrive at costs that meet customer expectations, are lower than their competitors, and are profitable to the organization. They calculate the cost of all the necessary parts, raw materials, and equipment. Estimators arrive at labor costs based on hourly rates and the time they think it will take to produce the product or provide the service desired. They prepare itemized cost estimates and/or present total project costs.
  • Mathematicians–Mathematicians specialize in either theoretical mathematics or applied mathematics. Most mathematicians work in applied mathematics. They solve problems using many different kinds of math and math-related areas. These include computer science, engineering, physics, and business management.
  • Mathematical StatisticiansStatisticians use math to design, interpret, and evaluate the results of experiments, surveys, and opinion polls. They also use math to predict future events. They often apply their mathematical knowledge to specific subject areas, such as economics, human behavior, natural science, or engineering.

Construction material estimators, mathematicians, and mathematical statisticians are Hot Occupations. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 27%.

Focus on Occupations: Helping Others through Health-Related Occupations

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The winter months bring snow globe wonderlands, hot chocolate and unfortunately cold and flu season. Many professionals support keeping us healthy during this time of year and all year through. CareerLocker acknowledges those that help us stay healthy by conducting research, administering at health care facilities, attending to our health, and communicating our health care needs. CareerLocker highlights five exciting occupations in health care: geneticists, health care administrators, nurse practitioners, translators and interpreters, and ultrasound technologists.

  • Geneticists-use scientific methods to research genes found in the cells of plants and animals. These genes contain the inherent traits and characteristics that differentiate one plant variety from another and one human from another. Geneticists research human genes, trying to identify the ones that contain the individual’s natural response to different diseases. By identifying these genes, they may be able to identify individuals most susceptible to certain diseases and develop pharmaceutics to retard, cure, or even prevent these diseases.
  • Health Care Administrators-direct activities at health care facilities to ensure that patients medical needs are meet. In large hospitals, health care administrators supervise the managers of several departments such as public relations, accounting, and personnel. They also develop the operating budget for the health care facility.
  • Nurse Practitioners and specialists — are registered nurses who have become expert in a specific area of nursing. They have earned either a master’s degree or doctorate in nursing. They have also completed supervised practice in their area of specialization, and have been certified by a national professional nursing organization.
  • Translators and Interpreters— communicate information from one language to another. Translators read text in one language and write it in another language. Interpreters listen to words spoken in one language and recount what was said in another language to another person.
  • Ultrasound Technologists — use special sound waves (called diagnostic medical sonographers) to produce images of people’s organs and tissues. They carefully position their patients to ensure that the shadowy images created by the ultrasound will bounce off of the tissues or organs that physicians have specified. These images are then recorded on a screen or film. Physicians study these images to diagnose and treat illnesses and diseases.

Feeling cold this winter?  These occupations will warm you up!  Health Care Administrators, Translators and Interpreters, and Ultrasound Technologists are Hot Occupations. Over the next 10 years, job openings in these occupation are projected to increase by at least 27%.

Learn more about these and other occupations on CareerLocker.

Focus on Occupations: Animal-Related Occupations

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In October and November, our four-legged friends and wildlife are in the spotlight. CareerLocker acknowledges National Animal Safety and Protection Month, Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, Squirrel Awareness Month, and Wishbones for Pets Month.  People who support the safety, protection, adoption, awareness, or well-being of pets and wildlife serve animals and the animal lovers in us all.  A great way to remember and honor the value of wildlife, animals and pets is by recognizing those who work with animals in various capacities. This month CareerLocker highlights animal chiropractors, animal trainers, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and wildlife biologists.

  • Animal Chiropractors–provide an alternative form of health care for cats, dogs, and horses using the same principles as applied by human chiropractors. Using their hands, they manipulate the spinal cord and joints to relieve pressure on nerves that affect feeling and control of the surrounding muscles. Pet owners are referred to animal chiropractors by veterinarians when x-rays confirm that surgery is not warranted for pets that have slipped or fallen, been injured due to strenuous activity, or that have survived automobile accidents. The animal chiropractor also instructs the pet owners on the acceptable level of activity and may make diet recommendations for the animals under their care.
  • Animal Trainers–train animals for riding, security, performance, obedience, or assisting persons with disabilities. Animal trainers do this by accustoming the animal to human voice and contact, and conditioning the animal to respond to commands. Animal trainers may train animals to prescribed standards for show or competition. Animal training takes place in small steps, and often takes months and even years of repetition. During the conditioning process, trainers provide animals with mental stimulation, physical exercise, and husbandry care. In addition to their hands-on work with the animals, trainers often oversee other aspects of the animal’s care, such as diet preparation.
  • Veterinarians–protect animal health through medicine, surgery, and providing information about animal health to pet owners and animal caregivers. Veterinarians practice medicine and surgery with companion pets, animals raised for human consumption, horses, animals in zoos, animals for military use, or in a combination of fields. Veterinarians oversee and inspect every aspect of the animal food supply, ensuring that the United States has one of the safest in the world. Veterinarians usually work with either small animals (such as dogs or cats) or large animals (such as horses or cows). They may specialize in specific medical fields such as oncology or neurology. Other veterinarians may do research, teach, or work in the animal industry.
  • Veterinary Technicians–assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They also sterilize instruments and clean operating and examining rooms. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They clean the animal cages and prepare food for each animal as instructed. They note the condition and behavior of the animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites. Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.
    • This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 27%.
  • Wildlife Biologists–study the populations, habitats, and conservation of wildlife and fish. Wildlife biologists usually specialize in subtopics within the field of wildlife biology. For example, some may study the relationship between predators and prey within an ecosystem. Others may study the routes of migratory birds. Wildlife biologists may research the impact that humans or environmental changes have had on wildlife, or they may coordinate programs to control the outbreak of wildlife diseases. Yet other wildlife biologists may specialize in the conservation and management of wild game, such as pheasants or deer, and the restoration of habitat. Wildlife biologists explain what they have discovered through their research by writing reports, publishing scientific papers or journal articles, and making presentations. Additionally, wildlife biologists may visit schools, clubs, interest groups, and park interpretive programs to teach people about wildlife.

Learn more about these and other occupations on CareerLocker.

Forward Thinking: Focus on Occupations related to Education, Reading, and Writing

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Welcome back to the 2017-2018 academic year. It is a great time to acknowledge all who contribute to our academic experiences, especially those who support our reading and writing.  From teachers to librarians to principals, educators support our academic, social, cultural, and emotional development.  In addition, September has several events nationally highlighted that include occupations where people use reading and writing related skills. September is Library Card Sign-Up Month, Be Kind to Editors and Writers Month, and Update Your Resume Month.  In the spirit of thanking educators and those who write, CareerLocker focuses on jobs that require high level technical skills in reading and writing.  Further, the people who teach us how to partake in these endeavors are emphasized.

  • Librarians—Librarians work in schools or the community.  Librarians select and organize materials, such as books, videos and magazines, and make them available to the public. They help people use the catalog system, reference books, and computer terminals. They tell people how to locate materials in the library. They also answer questions for people who call the library.
  • Secondary school teachers–Secondary school teachers teach middle school or high school students. They teach specific subjects such as English, math, social studies, and science. Teachers usually teach five or six classes per day. They prepare lesson plans, conduct class discussions, give homework assignments, and tests. They also correct homework and grade tests. They monitor the progress of their students and discuss it with their students’ parents.
  • Technical Writers–Technical writers prepare reports, manuals, bulletins, and articles for a wide variety of applications. They must write about complex matters in simple, easy-to-understand language. They study technical subjects until they understand the concepts involved. They then use their communications skills to write about these subjects.
  • Writers–Literary writers create stories, plays, poems, and novels. Writers must be certain that their works are well written and easy to understand. Writers read their finished pieces several times to check spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

To focus on and read about these exciting occupations, go to careerlocker.wisc.edu.

Keep it MOOOVING Forward: June is National Dairy Month

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Originating in 1937 as National Milk Month, June has evolved into National Dairy Month (International Dairy Foods Association). Dairy is an excellent source of vitamins and protein, providing nutrients to support growing bodies. It is a staple food eaten in a variety of ways across the world–including cheese. Cheese is among Wisconsin’s largest export. Recently, a Wisconsin cheese won the World Championship Cheese Contest, making this the first time a United States cheese earned this honor since 1988 (Wisconsin State Journal, March 10, 2016). For Dairy Month, CareerLocker highlights occupations that are crucial to the success of agriculture and dairy industries. Not only is producing dairy products an important endeavor, but also caring for the health of animals in the dairy industry is central to the success of Wisconsin farmers. Dairy, agriculture, and transportation professionals produce and move foods and commodities, while veterinary technicians care for the animals that produce milk. These occupations are part of the processes that allow for delicious contributions to the world. Transporting agricultural and dairy products keeps us MOOOOOVING in more than one way.

  • Cheesemakers–Cheesemakers direct the preparation, curing, packaging, and storage of cheeses. They direct the heating of the milk and check butter fat levels adjusting them as necessary. They add enzymes such as rennin that curdles the milk to create the desired texture, and/or enzymes and molds to produce the distinct flavor of each type of cheese.They make log entries recording the steps and time frames involved in producing each batch of cheese. When a dairy product of high quality has been created, they supervise the storage, packaging, and shipment of those products. See our posting on Facebook of a video about LaClare farms and learn about Katie Fuhrann, a Wisconsin cheesemaker.
  • Heavy Truck Drivers/Diesel Technicians—For the month of March, Careers Forward highlighted heavy truck drivers, as a high-skill and high-demand occupation. This month, CareerLocker emphasizes this occupation’s importance to dairy and agriculture industries. Just like transportation helps move people around, drivers and mechanics also help in the process of moving food and agricultural products.  Heavy truck drivers transport and deliver goods, such as dairy, corn, soy, and wheat, over short and long distances.  Without the assistance of diesel technicians, heavy truck drivers would not be able to do their jobs.  Diesel technicians repair and maintain diesel engines, which power machinery used in farming, construction, and transportation. Without the transportation of food, agricultural professionals would not be able to get their products to consumers.
  • Veterinary Technicians—Caring for the treatment of animals is central to dairy and animal husbandry industries. Veterinary technicians assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They note the condition and behavior of animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites.  Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.   This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 20%.

    Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.
    Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She has dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

Moving Forward: Transportation Jobs are On the Move

FocusonOccs04TransportDo you like trucks, trains, planes, and boats? How about reading and creating maps? Do you dream about sailing on the open water, would you prefer flying the clear, blue skies, or would you rather keep your feet on the ground? If jobs that provide time outdoors are part of your passion, consider transportation occupations that involve moving commodities, people and goods cross-country by land, sea, and air. Beyond moving people and things, you could also build and maintain modes of transportation. This month CareerLocker celebrates National Transportation Week, a time to acknowledge all who keep the country moving forward. The third week in May is National Transportation Week.

  • Aircraft Engine Mechanics– Aircraft engine mechanics service and repair aircraft engines and systems. They inspect, test, and adjust jet and propeller driven engines. They also repair and replace engine parts. They record all work done in logs which are reviewed periodically for compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. These mechanics use hand tools, power tools, electronic diagnostic equipment, and precision measuring instruments such as calipers and micrometers. They also fly on test flights to make in-flight adjustments to controls. Over the next 10 years, Aircraft Engine Mechanics openings are projected to grow by over 20%, making it a Hot Job.
  • Ship Mates- Ship mates, which includes Great Lakes ship officers, supervise crews on merchant ships that sail the lakes, oceans, and connecting waterways. Deck officers, called mates, supervise sailors who clean the ship’s deck, hull, and bridge. They inspect gear and equipment and order repairs as needed. These officers also supervise cargo loading and unloading. They ensure that the load has been strategically distributed on the cargo deck for maximum stability and is secured to prevent shifting in inclement weather conditions. Mates stand watch and use various instruments to determine the geographical position of the ship. All officers record their orders, activities, and other information in the ship’s log while on duty. Watch this PBS special for a day-in-the-life working on a Wisconsin boat.
  • Cartographers (Mappers)– Cartographers prepare both digital and printed maps by researching and analyzing existing maps and charts of the specific area to be mapped. They may determine that a field survey needs to be conducted or that additional aerial or satellite photographs be taken. They interpret and utilize the information on photographs using precision 3-dimensional tools called stereoplotting apparatus and 3-dimensional computer software programs and laser plotters to create new maps instead of drawing them by hand. They may also use remote sensing techniques such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to meet the accuracy specifications for the new map. They enter all the information gained from the surveys, aerial photographs, and remote sensing methods into a digital computer database. Cartography is also a Hot Job.

Each of these occupations requires a high level of competence, attention to detail, safety and application of technical skills.  Whether you choose to spend your time in the air, water or on land, transportation occupations keep the world moving forward. To learn about these highlighted occupations and watch videos go to the CareerLocker homepage.


Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.

Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She is pursuing dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

 

Go Green: Environmentally-Friendly Jobs are on the Move

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Do you enjoy being in nature or being a good steward of the environment?  Have you thought about efficient ways to get people and things around? To sustain and conserve the earth’s resources, today more focus is given to Green Jobs than ever before. April 22nd is Earth Day. CareerLocker celebrates Earth Day by exploring occupations that protect our environment. Many employers are pursuing ways to maximize utility in an efficient and safe way for not only people, but also for the world.

In addition, there are domestic and international movements toward public transportation and green and sustainable methods of transportation. The way we heat and cool our homes and businesses is changing through the expansion of using solar energy. Discover four occupations that involve conservation.

  • Bus Drivers— How do you get to where you want to go? Public transportation is among the most efficient ways of moving people. Bus drivers contribute to the ways the masses move. There are three types of bus drivers: local, intercity or charter, and school. They follow predetermined routes and time schedules to transport people within a city, from one city to another, or across the country. They inspect their buses before beginning each trip. They check brake lights and signals; tire pressure; and fuel, oil, and water levels, also adjusting bus temperatures for the comfort of their passengers. Travel your way through this exciting occupation by getting on the information highway and learning more about this fun occupation.
  •  Logisticians– Logisticians coordinate the manufacturing and delivering of products and services to ensure compliance with their customers’ purchase contracts. Considering manufacturing materials and processes, personnel, and the delivery of the products, logisticians must demonstrate the ability to pay high attention to detail. Typically logisticians have four-year degrees. Right out of college, they can earn around $45,000 per year, and with increasing experience earnings can reach as high as $114,000 per year. Logisticians have a projected 28% growth rate over the next ten years, making it a “hot” job.
  • Railroad Conductors and Yardmasters—Did you watch Thomas the Train as a child? Do you like to travel and aspire to see the country? Railroad conductors and yardmasters are in charge of train and yard crews. They assure that passengers and freight get to their destinations safely and on schedule. They frequently interact with passengers, engineers, and staff. Enjoying high salaries and good benefits, they take pride in delivering people and products safely and on schedule. Be like Thomas, make friends, and pursue a career in the railroad industry.
  • Solar Panel Installers— Do you like the outdoors? How do you stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer? What green energy workers are helping the energy grid that powers the computer you are working on to read this? Solar panel installers place solar panels in sunny places to utilize the sun’s power as an energy source. They install solar modules on the ground, on poles, on roofs, and on the sides of buildings. The solar modules are made from solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity. Once a solar module is installed, it can create energy for 25 years.

Whether you choose to help move things, move people, or heat and cool our homes, each of these occupations, bus drivers, logisticians, railroad conductors and yardmasters, and solar panel installers are needed to conserve the environment. While meeting the needs of people, green jobs focus on long-term sustainability. Green energy is the heat wave of the future! Each of these occupations requires a high level of competence, attention-to-detail and safety, and application of technical skills. To view these highlighted occupations and watch videos, go to the CareerLocker homepage.

“Hot” jobs are jobs projected to increase nationally in job openings by at least 20% over the next 10 years.

 


 

Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.

Asma Easa
Asma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She is pursuing dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.