Summer Institute Highlights Academic and Career Planning, Labor Market Information and Informal Assessments

18th Annual Summer Institute

Join us this summer for professional development workshops delivered on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Here’s your opportunity to network with colleagues and receive quality professional development training.

Institute #1: FORWARD into the Future: Developing Your Academic and Career Plans for Grades 6-12 (ACP)

Thursday, July 13, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm :: $129

Whether you serve as a K-12 educator, as a higher education professional, or as a professional in the community, learning about Academic and Career Planning (ACP) can help you support your students’ or clients’ career development. PI 26 requires students in the state of Wisconsin grades 6-12 to have an ACP. Learn how to examine what aspects of ACP your school or organization is already implementing. Discover new activities for working with students and clients to help them Know, Explore, Plan and Go, the foundation of ACP. Explore professional development activities to train staff to engage with ACP implementation.

This workshop will include didactic and experiential activities to maximize participants’ foundational knowledge of ACP, and provide ideas for working with students and clients with the aim of increasing the number of college and career ready students in the state of Wisconsin and beyond.

Institute #2: Observations on Emerging Labor Market Trends

Friday, July 14, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm :: $65

What role does career and labor market information play in career decision-making? How can we use that information to enhance both exploration and goal setting? As career practitioners, we frequently search through resources attempting to use the most up-to-date and relevant information but it is sometimes difficult to know which source to use.

This Institute will increase your confidence when locating, evaluating, and using career information to help individuals with their career concerns. Specifically we will talk about trending terms such as the “skills gap”, the “gig economy” (contract work), digital badges, and how this information can be used to assist our clients and students.

Institute #3: Informal Assessments and Methods for Using Them in Your Practice

Friday, July 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm :: $65

Informal assessments typically generate information about individuals through less structured means. They emphasize qualitative findings rather than quantitative. While these instruments are less precise than formal assessments, they are often dynamic and allow for more involvement by the client/student both when the instrument is administered and when the results are discussed.

During this Institute we will spend time completing and examining several instruments. We will also engage in the narrative approach that is used with much success in career planning. Throughout the Institute participants will also have an opportunity to practice their listening/interviewing skills.

Credit in the form of a Certificate of Attendance will be given which can be used to verify hours. CEUs ($15 fee payable on site) and NBCC credit are also available.

For more information on the Summer Institute and to register, click here.

Please direct any questions to Judy Ettinger at jmetting@wisc.edu

Keep it MOOOVING Forward: June is National Dairy Month

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Originating in 1937 as National Milk Month, June has evolved into National Dairy Month (International Dairy Foods Association). Dairy is an excellent source of vitamins and protein, providing nutrients to support growing bodies. It is a staple food eaten in a variety of ways across the world–including cheese. Cheese is among Wisconsin’s largest export. Recently, a Wisconsin cheese won the World Championship Cheese Contest, making this the first time a United States cheese earned this honor since 1988 (Wisconsin State Journal, March 10, 2016). For Dairy Month, CareerLocker highlights occupations that are crucial to the success of agriculture and dairy industries. Not only is producing dairy products an important endeavor, but also caring for the health of animals in the dairy industry is central to the success of Wisconsin farmers. Dairy, agriculture, and transportation professionals produce and move foods and commodities, while veterinary technicians care for the animals that produce milk. These occupations are part of the processes that allow for delicious contributions to the world. Transporting agricultural and dairy products keeps us MOOOOOVING in more than one way.

  • Cheesemakers–Cheesemakers direct the preparation, curing, packaging, and storage of cheeses. They direct the heating of the milk and check butter fat levels adjusting them as necessary. They add enzymes such as rennin that curdles the milk to create the desired texture, and/or enzymes and molds to produce the distinct flavor of each type of cheese.They make log entries recording the steps and time frames involved in producing each batch of cheese. When a dairy product of high quality has been created, they supervise the storage, packaging, and shipment of those products. See our posting on Facebook of a video about LaClare farms and learn about Katie Fuhrann, a Wisconsin cheesemaker.
  • Heavy Truck Drivers/Diesel Technicians—For the month of March, Careers Forward highlighted heavy truck drivers, as a high-skill and high-demand occupation. This month, CareerLocker emphasizes this occupation’s importance to dairy and agriculture industries. Just like transportation helps move people around, drivers and mechanics also help in the process of moving food and agricultural products.  Heavy truck drivers transport and deliver goods, such as dairy, corn, soy, and wheat, over short and long distances.  Without the assistance of diesel technicians, heavy truck drivers would not be able to do their jobs.  Diesel technicians repair and maintain diesel engines, which power machinery used in farming, construction, and transportation. Without the transportation of food, agricultural professionals would not be able to get their products to consumers.
  • Veterinary Technicians—Caring for the treatment of animals is central to dairy and animal husbandry industries. Veterinary technicians assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They note the condition and behavior of animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites.  Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.   This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 20%.

    Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.
    Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She has dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

CareerLocker Assessments: Reliable and Validated

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Part 1 of a 2 Part Series
by Dr. David Caulum, Emeritus Dr. Julie M. Hau
University of Wisconsin-Madison

State of the Art

To the best of our knowledge, CareerLocker has the longest tested and validated assessments included in a career information system in the state of Wisconsin. These assessments are essential to implementing Academic and Career Planning (ACP) programs. The four validated assessments offered through CareerLocker are the Personal Globe Inventory, Learning Styles Inventory, Work Skills Inventory, and Work Values Inventory. Through rigorous research and test development methodologies, these inventories have demonstrated high reliability and validity.

Reliability

In order to validate an assessment, one must determine if it measures consistently. That is, is it reliable? Reliability refers to the consistency of scores obtained from an assessment. For instance, when measuring the same piece of string with a ruler, one wants to be sure that the same results are achieved time after time. CareerLocker assessments work in a similar way. In highly reliable assessments, like those in CareerLocker, users receive consistent results each time. Since an assessment is usually given only once to a user, it must be as accurate as possible. When an assessment is reliable, it is more likely to be a true reflection of the user. In the case of CareerLocker, assessments reflect the user’s interests, learning styles, skills, and values.

Validity

The second indicator of a good assessment is whether or not it actually measures the quality or attribute that it purports to measure. Simply put, the assessment measures what it says it measures. Returning to the example of a ruler, an inch measures an inch, not a centimeter or a foot. Validity also refers to the appropriateness, meaningfulness, and usefulness of the inferences made from assessment scores. An inference is an educated guess based upon previous information and statistics. Validity is a scientific way of verifying that the use of the results of a psychological assessment is conceptually sound. Thus, validity is arguably the primary means of evaluating the quality or soundness of a psychological assessment. CareerLocker assessments have high quality.

Having reliable and validated instruments is among the many strengths of CareerLocker. These assessments provide the foundation for additional career exploration of occupations, career pathways and education. The website also supports job seeking processes, including aspects such as the resume and job interviews. Coming soon are additional pages on networking and financial aid.


 

For More Information

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Numerous research reports are available describing the processes used to develop and validate each scale. Usage data is also continuously monitored to evaluate and improve each inventory or assessment. CareerLocker has an extensive library of published and unpublished studies supporting the reliability and validation of its assessments. To obtain a list of publications or ask specific questions, please email Dr. David Caulum, dacaulum@wisc.edu.

David Caulum, PhD has worked at the Center on Education and Work as a Marketing Manager, Interim Director, Director, and, currently, Emeritus Consultant and Researcher. He now focuses his attention on CareerLocker Assessments and issues of content reliability and soundness.

 

CareerLocker: A Slam Dunk to help you Select a College or University

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The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) annually oversees March Madness Division I men’s and women’s basketball championships. The students, who participate in these tournaments, reflect excellence both on the court and in the classroom. CareerLocker is a valuable resource to teach you about the 132 colleges and universities represented by these college student athletes.

Pick your Teams

Every year NCAA releases a list of brackets for the tournament. UW-Madison professor of industrial and systems engineering, Laura Albert McLay, uses data analytic techniques to try to accurately predict NCAA winners. In an article about Dr. McLay’s work in On Wisconsin, a UW-Madison alumni magazine, she explains how she implements these techniques to more effectively predict the tournament winning schools.

Selecting your Winning School

The extensive CareerLocker website lists over 6,000 college and universities. Create your own brackets of contenders of schools you are considering attending. CareerLocker is a resource to help expand you options or narrow your choices to make college attendance decisions. The website lists general, academic, application and admissions, athletics, expenses, majors and degrees, and student life information. You can also conduct side-by-side comparisons of schools you are considering.

Go to the CareerLocker homepage and read Focus on Education to learn more about the various colleges in the NCAA tournament. Wherever you decide to attend school, CareerLocker is a slam dunk, supporting you through your decision-making process!

CEW Invites you to Participate in our Summer Institute

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Join us this summer for professional development workshops. Here’s your opportunity to network with colleagues and receive quality professional development training.

Workshops include:

Institute #1: Making the Connection Between Academic and Career Planning (ACP) and Career Development

Institute #2: Creating a Virtual Career Center:  Standards, Strategies, and Resources

 

Click on the following links for detailed descriptions and a registration form.

http://cew.wisc.edu/institutes/default.aspx

http://cew.wisc.edu/docs/summer_institute/SI16-registration.pdf

I hope to see you on campus this summer,

Amy

Visit the CareerLocker Booth at the WSCA Conference Next Week

If you are planning to attend the Wisconsin School Counselor Association Conference (WSCA) next week in Madison, don’t forget to drop by my booth! I will be at booth number 18. Please also remember to check your program bags for a CareerLocker ad, which includes the reasons why you would want to stay with CareerLocker to meet the state’s ACP requirements.

I would also like to take this time to introduce our new partner, Paul Vidas, president of Nvolved Inc. Paul will be doing a WSCA session on GetNvolved, a web tool for volunteering and work-based learning. Schools can use GetNvolved to promote, track, and report on community service and work-based learning. Check it out at http://www.getnvolved.org, it is free for all schools!

Welcome to the First CareerLocker Tidbits Post!

As your training representative, I would like take this time to introduce you to my new CareerLocker Tidbits posts, where I will send out weekly (sometimes more) tidbits and useful hints on how to use CareerLocker!

As none of us have much time these days, I will make these posts as short as possible…starting off with this week’s tidbit:

Every building location is assigned one account, and each account gets their own specific registration codes. These registration codes link the professionals and students/or clients back to their organizations.

Picture of How to Create an Account in CareerLocker

Every account will also have one main person assigned as the CareerLocker administrator, and this person will be the one who can look up and edit student/client information. The CareerLocker administrator will also be able to look up and edit professional user information; along with granting administrative rights to specific professionals in an organization. This means, that if Ms. Jane Doe is listed as the administrator of your account, you can ask Jane Doe to grant you administrative rights for the 6-week career’s course you are teaching. That way, when your students and clients forget their user names and passwords, you can look them up yourself, instead of having to track down Ms. Jane Doe.

Picture of tools for the administrator in CareerLockerPicture of professional tools in CareerLocker

 That wraps up my tidbits for this week!

Stay tuned for more CareerLocker tidbits…

Amy