Summer Institute Highlights Academic and Career Planning, Labor Market Information and Informal Assessments

18th Annual Summer Institute

Join us this summer for professional development workshops delivered on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Here’s your opportunity to network with colleagues and receive quality professional development training.

Institute #1: FORWARD into the Future: Developing Your Academic and Career Plans for Grades 6-12 (ACP)

Thursday, July 13, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm :: $129

Whether you serve as a K-12 educator, as a higher education professional, or as a professional in the community, learning about Academic and Career Planning (ACP) can help you support your students’ or clients’ career development. PI 26 requires students in the state of Wisconsin grades 6-12 to have an ACP. Learn how to examine what aspects of ACP your school or organization is already implementing. Discover new activities for working with students and clients to help them Know, Explore, Plan and Go, the foundation of ACP. Explore professional development activities to train staff to engage with ACP implementation.

This workshop will include didactic and experiential activities to maximize participants’ foundational knowledge of ACP, and provide ideas for working with students and clients with the aim of increasing the number of college and career ready students in the state of Wisconsin and beyond.

Institute #2: Observations on Emerging Labor Market Trends

Friday, July 14, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm :: $65

What role does career and labor market information play in career decision-making? How can we use that information to enhance both exploration and goal setting? As career practitioners, we frequently search through resources attempting to use the most up-to-date and relevant information but it is sometimes difficult to know which source to use.

This Institute will increase your confidence when locating, evaluating, and using career information to help individuals with their career concerns. Specifically we will talk about trending terms such as the “skills gap”, the “gig economy” (contract work), digital badges, and how this information can be used to assist our clients and students.

Institute #3: Informal Assessments and Methods for Using Them in Your Practice

Friday, July 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm :: $65

Informal assessments typically generate information about individuals through less structured means. They emphasize qualitative findings rather than quantitative. While these instruments are less precise than formal assessments, they are often dynamic and allow for more involvement by the client/student both when the instrument is administered and when the results are discussed.

During this Institute we will spend time completing and examining several instruments. We will also engage in the narrative approach that is used with much success in career planning. Throughout the Institute participants will also have an opportunity to practice their listening/interviewing skills.

Credit in the form of a Certificate of Attendance will be given which can be used to verify hours. CEUs ($15 fee payable on site) and NBCC credit are also available.

For more information on the Summer Institute and to register, click here.

Please direct any questions to Judy Ettinger at jmetting@wisc.edu

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CareerLocker Assessments: Reliable and Validated

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Part 1 of a 2 Part Series
by Dr. David Caulum, Emeritus Dr. Julie M. Hau
University of Wisconsin-Madison

State of the Art

To the best of our knowledge, CareerLocker has the longest tested and validated assessments included in a career information system in the state of Wisconsin. These assessments are essential to implementing Academic and Career Planning (ACP) programs. The four validated assessments offered through CareerLocker are the Personal Globe Inventory, Learning Styles Inventory, Work Skills Inventory, and Work Values Inventory. Through rigorous research and test development methodologies, these inventories have demonstrated high reliability and validity.

Reliability

In order to validate an assessment, one must determine if it measures consistently. That is, is it reliable? Reliability refers to the consistency of scores obtained from an assessment. For instance, when measuring the same piece of string with a ruler, one wants to be sure that the same results are achieved time after time. CareerLocker assessments work in a similar way. In highly reliable assessments, like those in CareerLocker, users receive consistent results each time. Since an assessment is usually given only once to a user, it must be as accurate as possible. When an assessment is reliable, it is more likely to be a true reflection of the user. In the case of CareerLocker, assessments reflect the user’s interests, learning styles, skills, and values.

Validity

The second indicator of a good assessment is whether or not it actually measures the quality or attribute that it purports to measure. Simply put, the assessment measures what it says it measures. Returning to the example of a ruler, an inch measures an inch, not a centimeter or a foot. Validity also refers to the appropriateness, meaningfulness, and usefulness of the inferences made from assessment scores. An inference is an educated guess based upon previous information and statistics. Validity is a scientific way of verifying that the use of the results of a psychological assessment is conceptually sound. Thus, validity is arguably the primary means of evaluating the quality or soundness of a psychological assessment. CareerLocker assessments have high quality.

Having reliable and validated instruments is among the many strengths of CareerLocker. These assessments provide the foundation for additional career exploration of occupations, career pathways and education. The website also supports job seeking processes, including aspects such as the resume and job interviews. Coming soon are additional pages on networking and financial aid.


 

For More Information

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Numerous research reports are available describing the processes used to develop and validate each scale. Usage data is also continuously monitored to evaluate and improve each inventory or assessment. CareerLocker has an extensive library of published and unpublished studies supporting the reliability and validation of its assessments. To obtain a list of publications or ask specific questions, please email Dr. David Caulum, dacaulum@wisc.edu.

David Caulum, PhD has worked at the Center on Education and Work as a Marketing Manager, Interim Director, Director, and, currently, Emeritus Consultant and Researcher. He now focuses his attention on CareerLocker Assessments and issues of content reliability and soundness.