Forward Thinking: Focus on Occupations related to Education, Reading, and Writing

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Welcome back to the 2017-2018 academic year. It is a great time to acknowledge all who contribute to our academic experiences, especially those who support our reading and writing.  From teachers to librarians to principals, educators support our academic, social, cultural, and emotional development.  In addition, September has several events nationally highlighted that include occupations where people use reading and writing related skills. September is Library Card Sign-Up Month, Be Kind to Editors and Writers Month, and Update Your Resume Month.  In the spirit of thanking educators and those who write, CareerLocker focuses on jobs that require high level technical skills in reading and writing.  Further, the people who teach us how to partake in these endeavors are emphasized.

  • Librarians—Librarians work in schools or the community.  Librarians select and organize materials, such as books, videos and magazines, and make them available to the public. They help people use the catalog system, reference books, and computer terminals. They tell people how to locate materials in the library. They also answer questions for people who call the library.
  • Secondary school teachers–Secondary school teachers teach middle school or high school students. They teach specific subjects such as English, math, social studies, and science. Teachers usually teach five or six classes per day. They prepare lesson plans, conduct class discussions, give homework assignments, and tests. They also correct homework and grade tests. They monitor the progress of their students and discuss it with their students’ parents.
  • Technical Writers–Technical writers prepare reports, manuals, bulletins, and articles for a wide variety of applications. They must write about complex matters in simple, easy-to-understand language. They study technical subjects until they understand the concepts involved. They then use their communications skills to write about these subjects.
  • Writers–Literary writers create stories, plays, poems, and novels. Writers must be certain that their works are well written and easy to understand. Writers read their finished pieces several times to check spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

To focus on and read about these exciting occupations, go to careerlocker.wisc.edu.

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Keep it MOOOVING Forward: June is National Dairy Month

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Originating in 1937 as National Milk Month, June has evolved into National Dairy Month (International Dairy Foods Association). Dairy is an excellent source of vitamins and protein, providing nutrients to support growing bodies. It is a staple food eaten in a variety of ways across the world–including cheese. Cheese is among Wisconsin’s largest export. Recently, a Wisconsin cheese won the World Championship Cheese Contest, making this the first time a United States cheese earned this honor since 1988 (Wisconsin State Journal, March 10, 2016). For Dairy Month, CareerLocker highlights occupations that are crucial to the success of agriculture and dairy industries. Not only is producing dairy products an important endeavor, but also caring for the health of animals in the dairy industry is central to the success of Wisconsin farmers. Dairy, agriculture, and transportation professionals produce and move foods and commodities, while veterinary technicians care for the animals that produce milk. These occupations are part of the processes that allow for delicious contributions to the world. Transporting agricultural and dairy products keeps us MOOOOOVING in more than one way.

  • Cheesemakers–Cheesemakers direct the preparation, curing, packaging, and storage of cheeses. They direct the heating of the milk and check butter fat levels adjusting them as necessary. They add enzymes such as rennin that curdles the milk to create the desired texture, and/or enzymes and molds to produce the distinct flavor of each type of cheese.They make log entries recording the steps and time frames involved in producing each batch of cheese. When a dairy product of high quality has been created, they supervise the storage, packaging, and shipment of those products. See our posting on Facebook of a video about LaClare farms and learn about Katie Fuhrann, a Wisconsin cheesemaker.
  • Heavy Truck Drivers/Diesel Technicians—For the month of March, Careers Forward highlighted heavy truck drivers, as a high-skill and high-demand occupation. This month, CareerLocker emphasizes this occupation’s importance to dairy and agriculture industries. Just like transportation helps move people around, drivers and mechanics also help in the process of moving food and agricultural products.  Heavy truck drivers transport and deliver goods, such as dairy, corn, soy, and wheat, over short and long distances.  Without the assistance of diesel technicians, heavy truck drivers would not be able to do their jobs.  Diesel technicians repair and maintain diesel engines, which power machinery used in farming, construction, and transportation. Without the transportation of food, agricultural professionals would not be able to get their products to consumers.
  • Veterinary Technicians—Caring for the treatment of animals is central to dairy and animal husbandry industries. Veterinary technicians assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They note the condition and behavior of animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites.  Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.   This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 20%.

    Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.
    Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She has dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

New CareerLocker to be Launched this Fall

Hello educators!

The school year is almost up, and I would like to take this time to remind you that we here at the Center on Education & Work have been working very hard for the past few years on the redesign of our new website. Earlier this year, you were invited to take a look.

Please remember, you are welcome to take a look at the new website! Please take a look and let me know if you would like any changes, or if you have suggestions. You will be able to view the new site all summer long, as we are scheduled to switch over to the new site this fall.

Checking out our new website now will help prevent shell shock this fall when you log into CareerLocker and it looks totally different!

In case you haven’t created an account on our new demo site, here are instructions:

-log into your current CareerLocker account at https://wiscareers.wisc.edu
-at the page that says ‘Welcome Professionals,’ click on the new ‘CareerLocker link’ found under my video
-if you haven’t created an account, click ‘Create an account’ on the right-hand side of the page, found underneath the login fields
-enter the code: test-pro
-create a unique user name and password that you will use to log into this demo site from then on

We are still in progress of finishing up the site, so some features might be missing. However, if you have any suggestions, please send them to me, or send them through the feedback links!

Please take a look!

Amy

Career Pathways Consultant Position NOW posted!

The Department of Public Instruction, Career and Technical Education Team is currently seeking applicants to fill an Education Consultant position. The Education Consultant – Career Pathways is now available at http://wisc.jobs/public/job_view.asp?annoid=66211&jobid=65726&org=255&class=59480.

To see the position description, click here http://hr.dpi.wi.gov/files/hr/pdf/ec_cp.pdf.