Keep it MOOOVING Forward: June is National Dairy Month

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Originating in 1937 as National Milk Month, June has evolved into National Dairy Month (International Dairy Foods Association). Dairy is an excellent source of vitamins and protein, providing nutrients to support growing bodies. It is a staple food eaten in a variety of ways across the world–including cheese. Cheese is among Wisconsin’s largest export. Recently, a Wisconsin cheese won the World Championship Cheese Contest, making this the first time a United States cheese earned this honor since 1988 (Wisconsin State Journal, March 10, 2016). For Dairy Month, CareerLocker highlights occupations that are crucial to the success of agriculture and dairy industries. Not only is producing dairy products an important endeavor, but also caring for the health of animals in the dairy industry is central to the success of Wisconsin farmers. Dairy, agriculture, and transportation professionals produce and move foods and commodities, while veterinary technicians care for the animals that produce milk. These occupations are part of the processes that allow for delicious contributions to the world. Transporting agricultural and dairy products keeps us MOOOOOVING in more than one way.

  • Cheesemakers–Cheesemakers direct the preparation, curing, packaging, and storage of cheeses. They direct the heating of the milk and check butter fat levels adjusting them as necessary. They add enzymes such as rennin that curdles the milk to create the desired texture, and/or enzymes and molds to produce the distinct flavor of each type of cheese.They make log entries recording the steps and time frames involved in producing each batch of cheese. When a dairy product of high quality has been created, they supervise the storage, packaging, and shipment of those products. See our posting on Facebook of a video about LaClare farms and learn about Katie Fuhrann, a Wisconsin cheesemaker.
  • Heavy Truck Drivers/Diesel Technicians—For the month of March, Careers Forward highlighted heavy truck drivers, as a high-skill and high-demand occupation. This month, CareerLocker emphasizes this occupation’s importance to dairy and agriculture industries. Just like transportation helps move people around, drivers and mechanics also help in the process of moving food and agricultural products.  Heavy truck drivers transport and deliver goods, such as dairy, corn, soy, and wheat, over short and long distances.  Without the assistance of diesel technicians, heavy truck drivers would not be able to do their jobs.  Diesel technicians repair and maintain diesel engines, which power machinery used in farming, construction, and transportation. Without the transportation of food, agricultural professionals would not be able to get their products to consumers.
  • Veterinary Technicians—Caring for the treatment of animals is central to dairy and animal husbandry industries. Veterinary technicians assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They note the condition and behavior of animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites.  Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.   This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 20%.

    Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.
    Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She has dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

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Moving Forward: Transportation Jobs are On the Move

FocusonOccs04TransportDo you like trucks, trains, planes, and boats? How about reading and creating maps? Do you dream about sailing on the open water, would you prefer flying the clear, blue skies, or would you rather keep your feet on the ground? If jobs that provide time outdoors are part of your passion, consider transportation occupations that involve moving commodities, people and goods cross-country by land, sea, and air. Beyond moving people and things, you could also build and maintain modes of transportation. This month CareerLocker celebrates National Transportation Week, a time to acknowledge all who keep the country moving forward. The third week in May is National Transportation Week.

  • Aircraft Engine Mechanics– Aircraft engine mechanics service and repair aircraft engines and systems. They inspect, test, and adjust jet and propeller driven engines. They also repair and replace engine parts. They record all work done in logs which are reviewed periodically for compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. These mechanics use hand tools, power tools, electronic diagnostic equipment, and precision measuring instruments such as calipers and micrometers. They also fly on test flights to make in-flight adjustments to controls. Over the next 10 years, Aircraft Engine Mechanics openings are projected to grow by over 20%, making it a Hot Job.
  • Ship Mates- Ship mates, which includes Great Lakes ship officers, supervise crews on merchant ships that sail the lakes, oceans, and connecting waterways. Deck officers, called mates, supervise sailors who clean the ship’s deck, hull, and bridge. They inspect gear and equipment and order repairs as needed. These officers also supervise cargo loading and unloading. They ensure that the load has been strategically distributed on the cargo deck for maximum stability and is secured to prevent shifting in inclement weather conditions. Mates stand watch and use various instruments to determine the geographical position of the ship. All officers record their orders, activities, and other information in the ship’s log while on duty. Watch this PBS special for a day-in-the-life working on a Wisconsin boat.
  • Cartographers (Mappers)– Cartographers prepare both digital and printed maps by researching and analyzing existing maps and charts of the specific area to be mapped. They may determine that a field survey needs to be conducted or that additional aerial or satellite photographs be taken. They interpret and utilize the information on photographs using precision 3-dimensional tools called stereoplotting apparatus and 3-dimensional computer software programs and laser plotters to create new maps instead of drawing them by hand. They may also use remote sensing techniques such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to meet the accuracy specifications for the new map. They enter all the information gained from the surveys, aerial photographs, and remote sensing methods into a digital computer database. Cartography is also a Hot Job.

Each of these occupations requires a high level of competence, attention to detail, safety and application of technical skills.  Whether you choose to spend your time in the air, water or on land, transportation occupations keep the world moving forward. To learn about these highlighted occupations and watch videos go to the CareerLocker homepage.


Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.

Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She is pursuing dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

 

Go Green: Environmentally-Friendly Jobs are on the Move

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Do you enjoy being in nature or being a good steward of the environment?  Have you thought about efficient ways to get people and things around? To sustain and conserve the earth’s resources, today more focus is given to Green Jobs than ever before. April 22nd is Earth Day. CareerLocker celebrates Earth Day by exploring occupations that protect our environment. Many employers are pursuing ways to maximize utility in an efficient and safe way for not only people, but also for the world.

In addition, there are domestic and international movements toward public transportation and green and sustainable methods of transportation. The way we heat and cool our homes and businesses is changing through the expansion of using solar energy. Discover four occupations that involve conservation.

  • Bus Drivers— How do you get to where you want to go? Public transportation is among the most efficient ways of moving people. Bus drivers contribute to the ways the masses move. There are three types of bus drivers: local, intercity or charter, and school. They follow predetermined routes and time schedules to transport people within a city, from one city to another, or across the country. They inspect their buses before beginning each trip. They check brake lights and signals; tire pressure; and fuel, oil, and water levels, also adjusting bus temperatures for the comfort of their passengers. Travel your way through this exciting occupation by getting on the information highway and learning more about this fun occupation.
  •  Logisticians– Logisticians coordinate the manufacturing and delivering of products and services to ensure compliance with their customers’ purchase contracts. Considering manufacturing materials and processes, personnel, and the delivery of the products, logisticians must demonstrate the ability to pay high attention to detail. Typically logisticians have four-year degrees. Right out of college, they can earn around $45,000 per year, and with increasing experience earnings can reach as high as $114,000 per year. Logisticians have a projected 28% growth rate over the next ten years, making it a “hot” job.
  • Railroad Conductors and Yardmasters—Did you watch Thomas the Train as a child? Do you like to travel and aspire to see the country? Railroad conductors and yardmasters are in charge of train and yard crews. They assure that passengers and freight get to their destinations safely and on schedule. They frequently interact with passengers, engineers, and staff. Enjoying high salaries and good benefits, they take pride in delivering people and products safely and on schedule. Be like Thomas, make friends, and pursue a career in the railroad industry.
  • Solar Panel Installers— Do you like the outdoors? How do you stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer? What green energy workers are helping the energy grid that powers the computer you are working on to read this? Solar panel installers place solar panels in sunny places to utilize the sun’s power as an energy source. They install solar modules on the ground, on poles, on roofs, and on the sides of buildings. The solar modules are made from solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity. Once a solar module is installed, it can create energy for 25 years.

Whether you choose to help move things, move people, or heat and cool our homes, each of these occupations, bus drivers, logisticians, railroad conductors and yardmasters, and solar panel installers are needed to conserve the environment. While meeting the needs of people, green jobs focus on long-term sustainability. Green energy is the heat wave of the future! Each of these occupations requires a high level of competence, attention-to-detail and safety, and application of technical skills. To view these highlighted occupations and watch videos, go to the CareerLocker homepage.

“Hot” jobs are jobs projected to increase nationally in job openings by at least 20% over the next 10 years.

 


 

Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.

Asma Easa
Asma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She is pursuing dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

CEW Invites you to Participate in our Summer Institute

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Join us this summer for professional development workshops. Here’s your opportunity to network with colleagues and receive quality professional development training.

Workshops include:

Institute #1: Making the Connection Between Academic and Career Planning (ACP) and Career Development

Institute #2: Creating a Virtual Career Center:  Standards, Strategies, and Resources

 

Click on the following links for detailed descriptions and a registration form.

http://cew.wisc.edu/institutes/default.aspx

http://cew.wisc.edu/docs/summer_institute/SI16-registration.pdf

I hope to see you on campus this summer,

Amy

CDF Hybrid Class Scheduled in Green Bay Spring 2016

The Center on Education and Work has scheduled a hybrid Career Development Facilitator class for Spring, 2016.  For the first time, the face-to-face meetings will be held in Green Bay.  We want to offer this more convenient opportunity to those in the central and northern parts of the state who want to take advantage of this well-respected course offering.

We are on a very short timeline.  In order to hold the class, we need to have 12-15 registrants signed up by February 15th.  If you or any of your colleagues are interested, please contact the Instructor, Judy Ettinger, ASAP.  She can be reached at jmetting@wisc.edu

The dates of the course follow:
Start Date:  March 1st   End Date:  June 21st
Required Face-to-Face Meetings in Green Bay:  March 31-April 1st   and May 12-13
Cost:  $1450 plus the cost of books

This popular class has been taught in Madison since 1995.  If you would like more information about this program, go to our web site at http://www.cew.wisc.edu/cdf/default.aspx

Welcome to the First CareerLocker Tidbits Post!

As your training representative, I would like take this time to introduce you to my new CareerLocker Tidbits posts, where I will send out weekly (sometimes more) tidbits and useful hints on how to use CareerLocker!

As none of us have much time these days, I will make these posts as short as possible…starting off with this week’s tidbit:

Every building location is assigned one account, and each account gets their own specific registration codes. These registration codes link the professionals and students/or clients back to their organizations.

Picture of How to Create an Account in CareerLocker

Every account will also have one main person assigned as the CareerLocker administrator, and this person will be the one who can look up and edit student/client information. The CareerLocker administrator will also be able to look up and edit professional user information; along with granting administrative rights to specific professionals in an organization. This means, that if Ms. Jane Doe is listed as the administrator of your account, you can ask Jane Doe to grant you administrative rights for the 6-week career’s course you are teaching. That way, when your students and clients forget their user names and passwords, you can look them up yourself, instead of having to track down Ms. Jane Doe.

Picture of tools for the administrator in CareerLockerPicture of professional tools in CareerLocker

 That wraps up my tidbits for this week!

Stay tuned for more CareerLocker tidbits…

Amy

7 Reasons Why CareerLocker is Still Your Best Choice

You once made a decision that CareerLocker was the best system for your students’ career planning and preparation. That truth has not changed! You still have a choice.

You do NOT have to use Career Cruising for ACP! Per the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) ACP website*, “The state selected ACP software system is an optional choice for districts.  Districts are welcome to contract and pay for any system they desire as long as the elements of quality ACP are included.”

Here are some of the reasons you should stick with CareerLocker through the 2016-2017 school year… and beyond…

1 You’ll have uninterrupted, continual service.

By staying with CareerLocker, you will have ongoing access to the best career information system around – with no gap in service.

The state mandate for ACP services does not begin until the 2017-18 school year!

As of now, there is NO SIGNED CONTRACT with a new vendor and according to DPI:

This next phase of procurement has begun and may take many months before a final contract to provide ACP services is completed.”

2 Only CareerLocker has a quality matching classroom curriculum. The CareerLocker classroom curriculum allows you to use the site to help guide your students through important self and career exploration activities. This curriculum, developed by the West Allis West Milwaukee school district, makes using the site easy for busy classroom teachers. This curriculum meets WSCA and ACP standards.
3 Our system is the only one that provides you with validated assessments. Only CareerLocker offers validated assessments. This is one of the many advantages of staying with a system that was developed through the state’s flagship university.

Students can explore their interests, values, work skills and match them to occupations only on the CareerLocker system.

4 CareerLocker is the only place you get very specific Wisconsin school and job information. Only CareerLocker provides detailed information on Wisconsin postsecondary institutions, as well as detailed occupational salaries and job outlook in Wisconsin. This information is updated regularly and is provided especially for Wisconsin to aid Wisconsin students in their career and academic planning.
5 You still get unsurpassed personalized service.

You won’t be on a waiting list for service or training with CareerLocker. We are always here for you and can provide training to fit your needs and according to your schedule.

You’ve always been a valued customer of CareerLocker. We are still the only career information system that was developed right in your state at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

We will be here when you need us for personalized training at your convenience.

6 You still have access to the popular Learning Styles assessment and the Personal Globe Inventory. The Learning Styles assessment on CareerLocker is the most frequently used assessment on the site. Teachers tell us that it helps their students understand how they best learn—and that leads to more successful academic outcomes. The Personal Globe Inventory is widely used to help students narrow down their career interests and match them to possible occupations.
7 You will get free access to GetNvolved® through a new partnership with CareerLocker.

 

Through GetNvolved, an online service that helps students find work and volunteer activities, you can increase the academic impact of work-based learning and community service experiences of students.

* http://dpi.wi.gov/acp/faqs

Still not sure why you should stay with CareerLocker?

 Did you know that CareerLocker (housed at UW-Madison in Wisconsin) is in 594 schools and 226 districts, while Career Cruising (a Canadian company) is in 409 Wisconsin schools and 100 districts? Why? Because CareerLocker is a better system, delivering more of the features like assessments and local Wisconsin information that can help you to best assist Wisconsin students in their career and academic planning. Remember, you get what you pay for!

As always, if you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me directly. I am happy to work with you in any way I can to help you fulfill the state ACP requirements. I have confidence that CareerLocker is still the best choice you can make in a software system for academic and career exploration and planning.

Thank you in advance for considering CareerLocker as the career information system of your choice.

Amy Rivera

Training Representative

CareerLocker

UW-Madison Center on Education & Work

amy.rivera@wisc.edu

800-862-1071