Focus on Occupations: Educators Build Communities of Learners

Education-Related Occupations Graphic

Labor Day marks the end of summer, kicks off fall, and back-to-school. Schools are comprised of caring professionals who serve their communities by bringing their knowledge of best learning and teaching practices, supporting the development of the entire child. They help students expand their academic, physical, socio-emotional, vocational, and cognitive development. Here at CareerLocker, we recognize the hard work of these amazing professionals. From the teacher to the principal to the school maintenance worker, so many work together to enhance the welfare of children, adolescents, and adults. These children grow into adults who contribute to our community, country, and ultimately the world. Some of the education-related professions include education administrators, elementary and secondary school teachers, physical education teachers, school counselors, and speech-language pathologists.

  • Education Administrators–manage educational institutions or departments within them. Some direct the activities of preschools, while others supervise instruction in primary and secondary schools. Educational administrators select and supervise staff, prepare budgets, and evaluate programs. They preside over meetings and advise on matters related to their programs. They also attend school functions and promote good public relations.
  • Elementary school teachers–usually teach children in grades one through eight. They plan and teach lessons. They design learning activities for students each day. They also test and record the progress of each student. They discuss these records with parents. Some elementary teachers specialize in areas such as art, music, or physical education. In some schools, two or three teachers work together to teach classes. This is called team teaching.
  • Secondary school teachers–teach middle school or high school students. They teach specific subjects such as English, math, social studies, and science. Teachers usually teach five or six classes per day. They prepare lesson plans, conduct class discussions, give homework assignments, and tests. They also correct homework and grade tests. They monitor the progress of their students and discuss it with their students’ parents. Some coach athletic teams or serves as advisors to clubs.
  • Physical Education Teachers–teach sports and exercises to children and young adults in grades one through twelve. They plan games and exercises that improve fitness and develop students’ motor and coordination skills. These games and exercises are suited to the ages and abilities of their students. Physical education teachers may teach general fitness courses that provide regular exercise or teach the use of sports special equipment such as trampolines or weights. They teach the rules and techniques of indoor and outdoor sports, such as volleyball, basketball, or football.
  • School Counselors–work with all students to help them develop the skills they will need to learn, communicate, and work effectively. They help students identify their interests, skills, aptitudes, and educational goals. They help students plan their academic programs so they graduate from high school prepared for work or postsecondary education. Counselors give standardized tests to students to measure their achievement in school. They have students complete interest inventories or other questionnaires to help them identify their strengths, recognize problem areas, and explore career options. Counselors interpret these test results for students, their parents, and teachers.
  • Speech-Language Pathologists–work with people who have speech or language impairments. They evaluate the impairment of each individual and develop a therapy program to help each of them communicate more effectively. In early intervention programs, they work with infants and toddlers who have a variety of physical and/or developmental challenges. They work with families identifying their concerns, priorities, and preferences for their children. A comprehensive plan of care is developed for each individual that includes speech and language. Speech-language pathologists try to prevent communication problems from occurring. They test children to see if they speak as well as other children of the same age.

CareerLocker: Still a Slam Dunk to help you Select a College or University

Basketball HoopThe National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) annually oversees March Madness Division I men’s and women’s basketball championships. The students, who participate in these tournaments, reflect excellence both on the court and in the classroom. CareerLocker is a valuable resource to teach you about the 132 colleges and universities represented by these college student athletes.

Pick your Teams

Every year NCAA releases a list of brackets for the tournament. Again this year, UW-Madison professor of industrial and systems engineering, Laura Albert McLay, uses data analytic techniques to try to accurately predict NCAA winners. Dr. McLay has been on several news shows talking about “bracketology.” In addition, UW-Madison library is conducting a book bracket, where students select the winning book. Matilda, Harry Potter, and Lord of the Rings are among previous winners.

Selecting your Winning School

The extensive CareerLocker website lists over 6,000 colleges and universities. Use CareerLocker’s compare colleges and schools to create side-by-side comparisons of your contenders for schools to attend. The website lists general information, student body, costs, financial aid, admissions, sports, majors and degrees, and ROTC information. Wherever you decide to attend school, CareerLocker is a slam dunk, supporting you through your decision-making process!

Professional Development: Career Development Facilitator (CDF) Training

Global Career Development Training PhotoWhat is a Career Development Facilitator?

A Career Development Facilitator (CDF) is a person who works in any career development setting or who incorporates career development information or skills in their work with students, adults, clients, employees, or the public. A CDF has received in-depth training in the areas of career development in the form of 120 class/instructional hours, provided by a nationally qualified and certified trainer.

This training is centered around developing 12 competencies in the field, which were developed by the National Career Development Association (NCDA), the professional association for career development in the United States. After completion of the training, the individual may apply for and receive national certification through the Center for Credentialing and Education, a subsidiary of the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Who Should Receive this Training?

CDF training can enhance the skills and knowledge of individuals who work in any type of career development setting. This may include those who serve as a career group facilitator, career coach, intake interviewer, human resource specialist, school counselor, job search trainer, labor market information resource person, employment/ placement specialist, or workforce development staff person. CDFs from past classes have included those who work in corporations, government agencies, technical colleges, small private companies, large universities, high schools and middle schools, correctional institutions, and entrepreneurial settings.

Course Schedule

The Career Development Facilitator course is offered in a convenient hybrid format to suit the varying needs and schedules of participants. This format includes the online coursework as well as two 2-day trips for classes at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.**

Summer 2017 May 30 – Aug. 28, 2017
Class Format CDF Home Study/ Distance Education (hybrid)
Location Online and 2 meetings in Madison, WI on June 22-23 and July 27-28, 2017
Cost Tuition: $1450.00
Summer 2017 Registration Form
Books will be purchased by the student. Estimated book costs: $175-$185
Fall 2017 Sept. 12-Dec. 19, 2017
Class Format CDF Home Study/ Distance Education (hybrid)
Location Online and 2 meetings in Madison, WI on Oct. 5-6 and Nov. 15-16, 2017)
Cost Tuition: $1450.00
Fall 2017 Registration Form
Books will be purchased by the student. Estimated book costs: $175-$185

About the Instructor

Photo of Judy EttingerJudith Ettinger, PhD, LPC, is a CDF Master Trainer and CDF Instructor. She has been working in the field of career development for 30 years, and travels throughout the world delivering career development technical assistance and training. Dr. Ettinger is a Project Director at the Center on Education and Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the developer and instructor of the online, independent-study course Planning for Retirement: Exploring Your Career and Leisure Options. She has received numerous awards and recognition for her work, including the Distinguished Achievement Award, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Outstanding Practitioner Award, National Career Development Association; UCLA Extension Distinguished Instructor Award for 2012; and the National Customer Service Award from the U.S. Department of Labor.

For more information
Contact Judy Ettinger, Instructor, at:

Center on Education and Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison
1025 W. Johnson Street,
964 Educational Sciences Building
Madison, WI 53706-1796
jmetting@wisc.edu
(608) 263-4367

Focus on Occupations: Math-Related Occupations Add Up to Great Opportunities

Focus on Occupations, Math-Related Occupations Banner

March 14th or 3.14 is known as Pi Day. Pi is an irrational number and the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.  Almost every job requires people to have knowledge of math. In honor of Pi Day, CareerLocker focuses on occupations where people rely heavily on math to complete job tasks. Occupations include climate change analysts, computer programmers, construction materials estimators, mathematicians, and mathematical statisticians. Many of these occupations are hot occupations and projected to grow by at least 27% over the next 10 years. This adds up to great opportunities!

  • Climate Change Analysts–Climate change analysts study weather patterns to see how and why our modern climate is different from the climate of the past. They spend their time analyzing data and writing papers and speeches. They specifically study atmospheric temperature, ocean conditions, ice masses, and greenhouse gases. They are concerned with determining how these changes impact natural resources, animals, and people. Climate change analysts attempt to create mathematical models of climate change.
  • Computer Programmers–Computer programmers write instructions that tell computers to perform a variety of different tasks.Programmers use computer languages to write programs. They may write programs that will perform accounting or billing functions. Other programs may operate robots or computer-aided design (CAD) machine tool operations. Some programs allow people to create artwork or graphics, while others coordinate space flight operations.
  • Construction Material Estimators— Cost estimators determine the cost of manufacturing products or providing services to prospective customers. They must arrive at costs that meet customer expectations, are lower than their competitors, and are profitable to the organization. They calculate the cost of all the necessary parts, raw materials, and equipment. Estimators arrive at labor costs based on hourly rates and the time they think it will take to produce the product or provide the service desired. They prepare itemized cost estimates and/or present total project costs.
  • Mathematicians–Mathematicians specialize in either theoretical mathematics or applied mathematics. Most mathematicians work in applied mathematics. They solve problems using many different kinds of math and math-related areas. These include computer science, engineering, physics, and business management.
  • Mathematical StatisticiansStatisticians use math to design, interpret, and evaluate the results of experiments, surveys, and opinion polls. They also use math to predict future events. They often apply their mathematical knowledge to specific subject areas, such as economics, human behavior, natural science, or engineering.

Construction material estimators, mathematicians, and mathematical statisticians are Hot Occupations. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 27%.

Summer Institute Highlights Academic and Career Planning, Labor Market Information and Informal Assessments

18th Annual Summer Institute

Join us this summer for professional development workshops delivered on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Here’s your opportunity to network with colleagues and receive quality professional development training.

Institute #1: FORWARD into the Future: Developing Your Academic and Career Plans for Grades 6-12 (ACP)

Thursday, July 13, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm :: $129

Whether you serve as a K-12 educator, as a higher education professional, or as a professional in the community, learning about Academic and Career Planning (ACP) can help you support your students’ or clients’ career development. PI 26 requires students in the state of Wisconsin grades 6-12 to have an ACP. Learn how to examine what aspects of ACP your school or organization is already implementing. Discover new activities for working with students and clients to help them Know, Explore, Plan and Go, the foundation of ACP. Explore professional development activities to train staff to engage with ACP implementation.

This workshop will include didactic and experiential activities to maximize participants’ foundational knowledge of ACP, and provide ideas for working with students and clients with the aim of increasing the number of college and career ready students in the state of Wisconsin and beyond.

Institute #2: Observations on Emerging Labor Market Trends

Friday, July 14, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm :: $65

What role does career and labor market information play in career decision-making? How can we use that information to enhance both exploration and goal setting? As career practitioners, we frequently search through resources attempting to use the most up-to-date and relevant information but it is sometimes difficult to know which source to use.

This Institute will increase your confidence when locating, evaluating, and using career information to help individuals with their career concerns. Specifically we will talk about trending terms such as the “skills gap”, the “gig economy” (contract work), digital badges, and how this information can be used to assist our clients and students.

Institute #3: Informal Assessments and Methods for Using Them in Your Practice

Friday, July 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm :: $65

Informal assessments typically generate information about individuals through less structured means. They emphasize qualitative findings rather than quantitative. While these instruments are less precise than formal assessments, they are often dynamic and allow for more involvement by the client/student both when the instrument is administered and when the results are discussed.

During this Institute we will spend time completing and examining several instruments. We will also engage in the narrative approach that is used with much success in career planning. Throughout the Institute participants will also have an opportunity to practice their listening/interviewing skills.

Credit in the form of a Certificate of Attendance will be given which can be used to verify hours. CEUs ($15 fee payable on site) and NBCC credit are also available.

For more information on the Summer Institute and to register, click here.

Please direct any questions to Judy Ettinger at jmetting@wisc.edu

Focus on Occupations: Animal-Related Occupations

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In October and November, our four-legged friends and wildlife are in the spotlight. CareerLocker acknowledges National Animal Safety and Protection Month, Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, Squirrel Awareness Month, and Wishbones for Pets Month.  People who support the safety, protection, adoption, awareness, or well-being of pets and wildlife serve animals and the animal lovers in us all.  A great way to remember and honor the value of wildlife, animals and pets is by recognizing those who work with animals in various capacities. This month CareerLocker highlights animal chiropractors, animal trainers, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and wildlife biologists.

  • Animal Chiropractors–provide an alternative form of health care for cats, dogs, and horses using the same principles as applied by human chiropractors. Using their hands, they manipulate the spinal cord and joints to relieve pressure on nerves that affect feeling and control of the surrounding muscles. Pet owners are referred to animal chiropractors by veterinarians when x-rays confirm that surgery is not warranted for pets that have slipped or fallen, been injured due to strenuous activity, or that have survived automobile accidents. The animal chiropractor also instructs the pet owners on the acceptable level of activity and may make diet recommendations for the animals under their care.
  • Animal Trainers–train animals for riding, security, performance, obedience, or assisting persons with disabilities. Animal trainers do this by accustoming the animal to human voice and contact, and conditioning the animal to respond to commands. Animal trainers may train animals to prescribed standards for show or competition. Animal training takes place in small steps, and often takes months and even years of repetition. During the conditioning process, trainers provide animals with mental stimulation, physical exercise, and husbandry care. In addition to their hands-on work with the animals, trainers often oversee other aspects of the animal’s care, such as diet preparation.
  • Veterinarians–protect animal health through medicine, surgery, and providing information about animal health to pet owners and animal caregivers. Veterinarians practice medicine and surgery with companion pets, animals raised for human consumption, horses, animals in zoos, animals for military use, or in a combination of fields. Veterinarians oversee and inspect every aspect of the animal food supply, ensuring that the United States has one of the safest in the world. Veterinarians usually work with either small animals (such as dogs or cats) or large animals (such as horses or cows). They may specialize in specific medical fields such as oncology or neurology. Other veterinarians may do research, teach, or work in the animal industry.
  • Veterinary Technicians–assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They also sterilize instruments and clean operating and examining rooms. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They clean the animal cages and prepare food for each animal as instructed. They note the condition and behavior of the animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites. Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.
    • This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 27%.
  • Wildlife Biologists–study the populations, habitats, and conservation of wildlife and fish. Wildlife biologists usually specialize in subtopics within the field of wildlife biology. For example, some may study the relationship between predators and prey within an ecosystem. Others may study the routes of migratory birds. Wildlife biologists may research the impact that humans or environmental changes have had on wildlife, or they may coordinate programs to control the outbreak of wildlife diseases. Yet other wildlife biologists may specialize in the conservation and management of wild game, such as pheasants or deer, and the restoration of habitat. Wildlife biologists explain what they have discovered through their research by writing reports, publishing scientific papers or journal articles, and making presentations. Additionally, wildlife biologists may visit schools, clubs, interest groups, and park interpretive programs to teach people about wildlife.

Learn more about these and other occupations on CareerLocker.

Forward Thinking: Focus on Occupations related to Education, Reading, and Writing

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Welcome back to the 2017-2018 academic year. It is a great time to acknowledge all who contribute to our academic experiences, especially those who support our reading and writing.  From teachers to librarians to principals, educators support our academic, social, cultural, and emotional development.  In addition, September has several events nationally highlighted that include occupations where people use reading and writing related skills. September is Library Card Sign-Up Month, Be Kind to Editors and Writers Month, and Update Your Resume Month.  In the spirit of thanking educators and those who write, CareerLocker focuses on jobs that require high level technical skills in reading and writing.  Further, the people who teach us how to partake in these endeavors are emphasized.

  • Librarians—Librarians work in schools or the community.  Librarians select and organize materials, such as books, videos and magazines, and make them available to the public. They help people use the catalog system, reference books, and computer terminals. They tell people how to locate materials in the library. They also answer questions for people who call the library.
  • Secondary school teachers–Secondary school teachers teach middle school or high school students. They teach specific subjects such as English, math, social studies, and science. Teachers usually teach five or six classes per day. They prepare lesson plans, conduct class discussions, give homework assignments, and tests. They also correct homework and grade tests. They monitor the progress of their students and discuss it with their students’ parents.
  • Technical Writers–Technical writers prepare reports, manuals, bulletins, and articles for a wide variety of applications. They must write about complex matters in simple, easy-to-understand language. They study technical subjects until they understand the concepts involved. They then use their communications skills to write about these subjects.
  • Writers–Literary writers create stories, plays, poems, and novels. Writers must be certain that their works are well written and easy to understand. Writers read their finished pieces several times to check spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

To focus on and read about these exciting occupations, go to careerlocker.wisc.edu.

Keep it MOOOVING Forward: June is National Dairy Month

FocusonOccs05Dairy

Originating in 1937 as National Milk Month, June has evolved into National Dairy Month (International Dairy Foods Association). Dairy is an excellent source of vitamins and protein, providing nutrients to support growing bodies. It is a staple food eaten in a variety of ways across the world–including cheese. Cheese is among Wisconsin’s largest export. Recently, a Wisconsin cheese won the World Championship Cheese Contest, making this the first time a United States cheese earned this honor since 1988 (Wisconsin State Journal, March 10, 2016). For Dairy Month, CareerLocker highlights occupations that are crucial to the success of agriculture and dairy industries. Not only is producing dairy products an important endeavor, but also caring for the health of animals in the dairy industry is central to the success of Wisconsin farmers. Dairy, agriculture, and transportation professionals produce and move foods and commodities, while veterinary technicians care for the animals that produce milk. These occupations are part of the processes that allow for delicious contributions to the world. Transporting agricultural and dairy products keeps us MOOOOOVING in more than one way.

  • Cheesemakers–Cheesemakers direct the preparation, curing, packaging, and storage of cheeses. They direct the heating of the milk and check butter fat levels adjusting them as necessary. They add enzymes such as rennin that curdles the milk to create the desired texture, and/or enzymes and molds to produce the distinct flavor of each type of cheese.They make log entries recording the steps and time frames involved in producing each batch of cheese. When a dairy product of high quality has been created, they supervise the storage, packaging, and shipment of those products. See our posting on Facebook of a video about LaClare farms and learn about Katie Fuhrann, a Wisconsin cheesemaker.
  • Heavy Truck Drivers/Diesel Technicians—For the month of March, Careers Forward highlighted heavy truck drivers, as a high-skill and high-demand occupation. This month, CareerLocker emphasizes this occupation’s importance to dairy and agriculture industries. Just like transportation helps move people around, drivers and mechanics also help in the process of moving food and agricultural products.  Heavy truck drivers transport and deliver goods, such as dairy, corn, soy, and wheat, over short and long distances.  Without the assistance of diesel technicians, heavy truck drivers would not be able to do their jobs.  Diesel technicians repair and maintain diesel engines, which power machinery used in farming, construction, and transportation. Without the transportation of food, agricultural professionals would not be able to get their products to consumers.
  • Veterinary Technicians—Caring for the treatment of animals is central to dairy and animal husbandry industries. Veterinary technicians assist veterinarians as they examine and treat animals. They often administer anesthetics to animals and assist veterinarians as they perform surgical procedures. They lift and handle animals and give them medication as prescribed by the veterinarian. They note the condition and behavior of animals and report these observations to the veterinarian. They may do laboratory tests to identify diseases or parasites.  Some specialize in caring for small animals and work in veterinary clinics that care for dogs and/or cats. Others assist veterinarians who care for large animals such as cattle or endangered species housed in zoos.   This is a Hot Occupation. Over the next 10 years, job openings in this occupation are projected to increase by at least 20%.

    Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.
    Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She has dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

Moving Forward: Transportation Jobs are On the Move

FocusonOccs04TransportDo you like trucks, trains, planes, and boats? How about reading and creating maps? Do you dream about sailing on the open water, would you prefer flying the clear, blue skies, or would you rather keep your feet on the ground? If jobs that provide time outdoors are part of your passion, consider transportation occupations that involve moving commodities, people and goods cross-country by land, sea, and air. Beyond moving people and things, you could also build and maintain modes of transportation. This month CareerLocker celebrates National Transportation Week, a time to acknowledge all who keep the country moving forward. The third week in May is National Transportation Week.

  • Aircraft Engine Mechanics– Aircraft engine mechanics service and repair aircraft engines and systems. They inspect, test, and adjust jet and propeller driven engines. They also repair and replace engine parts. They record all work done in logs which are reviewed periodically for compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. These mechanics use hand tools, power tools, electronic diagnostic equipment, and precision measuring instruments such as calipers and micrometers. They also fly on test flights to make in-flight adjustments to controls. Over the next 10 years, Aircraft Engine Mechanics openings are projected to grow by over 20%, making it a Hot Job.
  • Ship Mates- Ship mates, which includes Great Lakes ship officers, supervise crews on merchant ships that sail the lakes, oceans, and connecting waterways. Deck officers, called mates, supervise sailors who clean the ship’s deck, hull, and bridge. They inspect gear and equipment and order repairs as needed. These officers also supervise cargo loading and unloading. They ensure that the load has been strategically distributed on the cargo deck for maximum stability and is secured to prevent shifting in inclement weather conditions. Mates stand watch and use various instruments to determine the geographical position of the ship. All officers record their orders, activities, and other information in the ship’s log while on duty. Watch this PBS special for a day-in-the-life working on a Wisconsin boat.
  • Cartographers (Mappers)– Cartographers prepare both digital and printed maps by researching and analyzing existing maps and charts of the specific area to be mapped. They may determine that a field survey needs to be conducted or that additional aerial or satellite photographs be taken. They interpret and utilize the information on photographs using precision 3-dimensional tools called stereoplotting apparatus and 3-dimensional computer software programs and laser plotters to create new maps instead of drawing them by hand. They may also use remote sensing techniques such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to meet the accuracy specifications for the new map. They enter all the information gained from the surveys, aerial photographs, and remote sensing methods into a digital computer database. Cartography is also a Hot Job.

Each of these occupations requires a high level of competence, attention to detail, safety and application of technical skills.  Whether you choose to spend your time in the air, water or on land, transportation occupations keep the world moving forward. To learn about these highlighted occupations and watch videos go to the CareerLocker homepage.


Co-written by Asma Easa and Julie M. Hau.

Asma EasaAsma Easa works at the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, one of five regional transportation workforce centers in the country. She is pursuing dual masters in International Public Affairs, and Urban and Regional Planning. Her focus areas include education policy and development.

 

CareerLocker Assessments: Reliable and Validated

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Part 1 of a 2 Part Series
by Dr. David Caulum, Emeritus Dr. Julie M. Hau
University of Wisconsin-Madison

State of the Art

To the best of our knowledge, CareerLocker has the longest tested and validated assessments included in a career information system in the state of Wisconsin. These assessments are essential to implementing Academic and Career Planning (ACP) programs. The four validated assessments offered through CareerLocker are the Personal Globe Inventory, Learning Styles Inventory, Work Skills Inventory, and Work Values Inventory. Through rigorous research and test development methodologies, these inventories have demonstrated high reliability and validity.

Reliability

In order to validate an assessment, one must determine if it measures consistently. That is, is it reliable? Reliability refers to the consistency of scores obtained from an assessment. For instance, when measuring the same piece of string with a ruler, one wants to be sure that the same results are achieved time after time. CareerLocker assessments work in a similar way. In highly reliable assessments, like those in CareerLocker, users receive consistent results each time. Since an assessment is usually given only once to a user, it must be as accurate as possible. When an assessment is reliable, it is more likely to be a true reflection of the user. In the case of CareerLocker, assessments reflect the user’s interests, learning styles, skills, and values.

Validity

The second indicator of a good assessment is whether or not it actually measures the quality or attribute that it purports to measure. Simply put, the assessment measures what it says it measures. Returning to the example of a ruler, an inch measures an inch, not a centimeter or a foot. Validity also refers to the appropriateness, meaningfulness, and usefulness of the inferences made from assessment scores. An inference is an educated guess based upon previous information and statistics. Validity is a scientific way of verifying that the use of the results of a psychological assessment is conceptually sound. Thus, validity is arguably the primary means of evaluating the quality or soundness of a psychological assessment. CareerLocker assessments have high quality.

Having reliable and validated instruments is among the many strengths of CareerLocker. These assessments provide the foundation for additional career exploration of occupations, career pathways and education. The website also supports job seeking processes, including aspects such as the resume and job interviews. Coming soon are additional pages on networking and financial aid.


 

For More Information

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Numerous research reports are available describing the processes used to develop and validate each scale. Usage data is also continuously monitored to evaluate and improve each inventory or assessment. CareerLocker has an extensive library of published and unpublished studies supporting the reliability and validation of its assessments. To obtain a list of publications or ask specific questions, please email Dr. David Caulum, dacaulum@wisc.edu.

David Caulum, PhD has worked at the Center on Education and Work as a Marketing Manager, Interim Director, Director, and, currently, Emeritus Consultant and Researcher. He now focuses his attention on CareerLocker Assessments and issues of content reliability and soundness.